How much tax money gets paid to EU? Europeans don’t know, RT poll reveals

By RT

RT correspondents interviewed nearly 200 people on the streets of Barcelona, Lisbon, Rome, Prague, Paris, Bratislava, Warsaw, Athens, London, and Berlin.

Those surveyed were asked to answer four questions about the European Union in which they live – including the whereabouts of the European Commission’s home, its top officials, and the contribution made by their country to the bloc’s budget.

The first question – Where is the European Commission headquarters located? – was the easiest and caused few problems to the respondents.

The correct answer was given by 117 people, who stated that the executive body of the European Union is located in Brussels, Belgium.

The second question turned out to be a bit tougher; only half of those interviewed were able to recognize Jose Manuel Barroso – who at the moment of the poll still occupied the position of EC President – after a picture was shown to them.

However, it turned out that it’s even harder for Europeans to name the EU’s foreign policy chief.

Only 30 people were able to name Baroness Catherine Ashton correctly, with many mispronouncing her name as “Ashcroft” or “Asworth.” Many confused the EU foreign policy chief with Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, and a number of local female politicians.

As for the final question – How much does your country pay to the EU budget? – the survey managed to collect just 11 right answers.

The majority of the respondents tried to guess the sum, with their speculations ranging from “20,000 euros” to “200 billion euros.”

Ironically, the EU’s leading economic and political power, Germany, produced the worst result in the poll. The amount of wrong answers given by Berliners exceeded the number of the right ones for all questions.

The biggest contributor to the EU budget in 2014 is the UK, which was asked to contribute 2.1 billion euros. Italy, Latvia, Greece, Ireland, Cyprus the Netherlands, and Malta will pay one billion.

Germany and France will pay just 500,000 euros each for their membership, while the rest of the union will be freed from taxation this year.

Via:: RT.com

How much tax money gets paid to EU? Europeans don’t know, RT poll reveals

By RT

RT correspondents interviewed nearly 200 people on the streets of Barcelona, Lisbon, Rome, Prague, Paris, Bratislava, Warsaw, Athens, London, and Berlin.

Those surveyed were asked to answer four questions about the European Union in which they live – including the whereabouts of the European Commission’s home, its top officials, and the contribution made by their country to the bloc’s budget.

The first question – Where is the European Commission headquarters located? – was the easiest and caused few problems to the respondents.

The correct answer was given by 117 people, who stated that the executive body of the European Union is located in Brussels, Belgium.

The second question turned out to be a bit tougher; only half of those interviewed were able to recognize Jose Manuel Barroso – who at the moment of the poll still occupied the position of EC President – after a picture was shown to them.

However, it turned out that it’s even harder for Europeans to name the EU’s foreign policy chief.

Only 30 people were able to name Baroness Catherine Ashton correctly, with many mispronouncing her name as “Ashcroft” or “Asworth.” Many confused the EU foreign policy chief with Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, and a number of local female politicians.

As for the final question – How much does your country pay to the EU budget? – the survey managed to collect just 11 right answers.

The majority of the respondents tried to guess the sum, with their speculations ranging from “20,000 euros” to “200 billion euros.”

Ironically, the EU’s leading economic and political power, Germany, produced the worst result in the poll. The amount of wrong answers given by Berliners exceeded the number of the right ones for all questions.

Via:: RT.com

Алексей Дыховичный, «Pressa» vs Пореченков

By info@echo.msk.ru (Эхо Москвы)

Пореченков, безусловно, совершил не очень умный поступок. Нельзя в его возрасте с довольной физиономией “играться в войнушку» с каской “Pressa» на голове, там, где идет реальная война и там, где реально убивают людей. Это было бы простительно 7-летнему ребенку, но не взрослому дяде, которого знает вся страна, ну или большая ее часть.
Но обвинять человека в том, что на его совести будущие смерти журналистов в районе конфликта в Новороссии – это называется травля. Те травили Макаревича, а мы теперь будем травить Пореченкова. Так получается?
Каска с надписью “Pressa» действительно защищает от пуль? А может, наоборот? Может, теперь будут думать – стоит ли стрелять по этим ребятам в касках “Pressa», возможно, это клоуны с Мосфильма резвятся, чего тратить на них пули? А может, так: а, вдруг, это Пореченков, классный актер, я не хотел бы его убить.
Короче, никому неизвестно, как сложится та или иная ситуация и по какой причине, не дай бог, убьют журналиста. Но если Вы хотите моего сочувствия и поддержки, то не нужно травить человека, пусть он и совершил глупый поступок.

Via:: Echo Moscow

Europe and Eurasia: The New European Commission

The New European Commission

Press StatementJohn Kerry
Secretary of State
Washington, DC
October 31, 2014

I look forward to collaborating with a new European Commission that will take office on November 1 under the leadership of President Jean-Claude Juncker.

He has assembled a talented group of European leaders for his new Commission, including old friends like incoming High Representative Federica Mogherini.

The United States and the European Union share a common past – one we honor a century after the start of the First World War. Today, we share a common vision for a Europe whole, free, and at peace.

Almost two decades ago, leaders of the United States and the European Union committed to work together to promote peace, stability, and democracy around the world. We agreed to respond to global challenges, together. And we agreed to expand world trade, bring our economies closer together, and build transatlantic bridges for people and ideas.

The issues we confront have changed over the years. But we have stayed true to our bedrock commitments. Today, we face serious threats to peace and stability from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, ISIL in the Middle East, and Russia’s actions in Ukraine. These are crises we will combat together. And we are negotiating an ambitious trade and investment partnership to bring our economies even closer.

After a decade of his remarkable leadership at the helm of this Commission, I thank outgoing Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso. I am also grateful for High Representative Catherine Ashton’s partnership over the years.

As the new Commission takes office, I look forward to working closely with them to reinforce the ties that bind the United States and the European Union.

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Via:: US State Department