Azerbaijan: ‘Family Is the First Fear’ of LGBT Community 

By k_kumkova
Copyright show:

No

The 19-year-old Azerbaijani man claims he awoke one morning in mid-August to the sound and feel of gasoline splashing on his body and his mother angrily screaming. Through a sleepy haze, he saw her burning a piece of paper. Suddenly, he alleged, his mother’s intentions became clear; he was about to be burned to death for being homosexual.

read more

Via:: EurasiaNet

Europe and Eurasia: Portugal

U.S. Relations With Portugal

Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs
Fact Sheet
August 27, 2014

More information about Portugal is available on the Portugal Page and from other Department of State publications and other sources listed at the end of this fact sheet.

U.S.-PORTUGAL RELATIONS

United States-Portugal bilateral ties date from the earliest years of the United States when Portugal was among the first countries to recognize the United States following the revolutionary war. The oldest continuously-operating U.S. Consulate is in Ponta Delgada on the island of Sao Miguel in the Azores. Contributing to the strong ties between the United States and Portugal are the presence of sizeable Portuguese communities in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Jersey, California, and Hawaii.

A strong, vocal pro-American sentiment across most of the political spectrum has combined to make the relationship between the United States and Portugal one of three pillars of Portugal’s foreign policy, along with the European Union and the Portuguese-speaking world. The United States and Portugal cooperate in the United Nations, in various regional organizations, and bilaterally for peace, prosperity, and security.

Portugal became a charter member of NATO in 1949; it is an active member of the Alliance, and Portuguese forces participate in NATO operations in Afghanistan and Kosovo. Under the 1995 U.S.-Portugal Agreement on Cooperation and Defense, Lajes Field in the Azores serves as a logistics hub for U.S. Transportation Command, U.S. European Command and NATO allies. In 2012, Naval Striking and Support Forces NATO (STRIKFORNATO) transferred from Italy to Portugal. STRIKFORNATO is NATO’s premier maritime battle staff and the Alliance’s primary link for integrating U.S. maritime forces into NATO operations. Portugal also has been a strong partner in the fight against terrorism and drug-trafficking.

Pursuant to the 1995 Agreement on Cooperation and Defense, the U.S.-Portugal Bilateral Commission meets semi-annually to review all aspects of the bilateral relationship, including defense cooperation, science and technology cooperation, bilateral trade and investment, cooperation in the Azores, justice and home affairs, and political and diplomatic cooperation. The U.S.-Portugal Fulbright Commission was founded in 1960 and funds graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and visiting professors. 

U.S. Assistance to Portugal
The United States provides no development assistance to Portugal.

Bilateral Economic Relations
As a member of the European Union (EU), Portugal is bound by EU treaties and laws, including those directly governing or indirectly impacting business investments. Portugal and the United States have enacted an income tax agreement to prevent double taxation. A U.S.-Portugal Treaty of Commerce and Navigation was terminated in 1892 and not been replaced. U.S.-Portuguese trade and investment is relatively small.

Portugal’s Membership in International Organizations
Portugal and the United States belong to a number of the same international organizations, including the United Nations, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council, Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, International Monetary Fund, World Bank, and World Trade Organization. Portugal is an observer to the Organization of American States.

Bilateral Representation
The U.S. Ambassador to Portugal is Robert A. Sherman; other principal embassy officials are listed in the Department’s Key Officers List.

Portugal maintains an embassy in the United States at 2012 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20036; tel. 202-350-5400.

More information about Portugal is available from the Department of State and other sources, some of which are listed here:

Department of State Portugal Page
Department of State Key Officers List
CIA World Factbook Portugal Page
U.S. Embassy: Portugal
History of U.S. Relations With Portugal
Human Rights Reports
International Religious Freedom Reports
Trafficking in Persons Reports
Narcotics Control Reports
Investment Climate Statements
U.S. Census Bureau Foreign Trade Statistics
Export.gov International Offices Page
Library of Congress Country Studies
Travel and Business Information 

The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

Via:: US State Department

Putin and Poroshenko shake hands in Minsk

According to Putin, Russia will abolish preferences for Ukrainian imports, if the Association Agreement between Ukraine and Europe starts working. “Russia can not stand still in this situation. We will be forced to take counter-measures to protect our market. We will simply have to introduce a standard trade regime with Ukraine,” said Putin

Via:: PRAVDA

Europe and Eurasia: Denmark

U.S. Relations With Denmark

Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs
Fact Sheet
August 26, 2014

More information about Denmark is available on the Denmark Page and from other Department of State publications and other sources listed at the end of this fact sheet.

U.S.-DENMARK RELATIONS

Denmark and the United States have long enjoyed a close and mutually beneficial relationship. The two countries consult closely on European and other regional political and security matters and cooperate extensively to promote peace and stability well beyond Europe’s borders. Denmark largely shares U.S. views on the positive ramifications of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) enlargement. Danish troops support International Security Assistance Force-led stabilization efforts in Afghanistan.

The U.S. Air Force base and early warning radar facility at Thule, in northwest Greenland, serves as a vital link in Western and NATO defenses. In 2004, the Danish and Greenland Home Rule governments signed agreements allowing for an upgrade of the Thule early warning radar in connection with a role in the U.S. ballistic missile defense system. The same agreements also created new opportunities for both sides to enhance economic, technical, and environmental cooperation between the United States and Greenland.

American culture–and particularly popular culture, from jazz, rock, and rap to television shows and literature–is very popular in Denmark. More than 300,000 U.S. tourists visit Denmark annually.

Bilateral Economic Relations

Denmark’s active liberal trade policy in the European Union (EU), Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and World Trade Organization largely coincides with U.S. interests. There have been differences of opinion between the U.S. and the EU on how to manage and resolve recent global and regional financial crises, but not on the importance of action. Denmark’s role in European environmental and agricultural issues and its strategic location at the entrance to the Baltic Sea have made Copenhagen a center for U.S. agencies and the private sector dealing with the Nordic/Baltic region.

The U.S. is Denmark’s largest non-European trade partner. Among major Danish exports to the United States are industrial machinery, chemical products, furniture, pharmaceuticals, canned ham and pork, windmills, and plastic toy blocks (Legos). In addition, Denmark has a significant services trade with the U.S., a major share of it stemming from Danish-controlled ships engaged in container traffic to and from the United States (notably by Maersk-Line). Over 400 U.S. companies have subsidiaries in Denmark.

Denmark’s Membership in International Organizations

Danish foreign policy is founded upon four cornerstones: the United Nations, NATO, the EU, and Nordic cooperation. Denmark and the United States belong to many of the same international organizations, including the UN, NATO, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, International Monetary Fund, World Bank, World Trade Organization, and the Arctic Council.

Bilateral Representation

The U.S. Ambassador to Denmark is Rufus Gifford; other principal embassy officials are listed in the Department’s Key Officers List.

Denmark maintains an embassy in the United States at 3200 Whitehaven Street NW, Washington, DC 20008-3683 (tel. 202-234-4300).

More information about Denmark is available from the Department of State and other sources, some of which are listed here:

Department of State Denmark Page
Department of State Key Officers List
CIA World Factbook Denmark Page
U.S. Embassy: Denmark
History of U.S. Relations With Denmark
Human Rights Reports
International Religious Freedom Reports
Trafficking in Persons Reports
Narcotics Control Reports
Investment Climate Statements
U.S. Census Bureau Foreign Trade Statistics
Export.gov International Offices Page
Travel and Business Information

The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

Via:: US State Department

Europe and Eurasia: Joint Statement on Libya by the Governments of France, Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the United States

Joint Statement on Libya by the Governments of France, Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the United States

Media NoteOffice of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
August 25, 2014

The governments of France, Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the United States strongly condemn the escalation of fighting and violence in and around Tripoli, Benghazi, and across Libya, especially against residential areas, public facilities, and critical infrastructure, by both land attacks and air strikes.

We reiterate our calls, joining those of the Libyan interim government, the House of Representatives, and the Libyan people, that all parties in Libya accept an immediate ceasefire and engage constructively in the democratic process, abstaining from confrontational initiatives that risk undermining it. We support the efforts of the UN Support Mission in Libya in this regard.

Those responsible for violence, which undermines Libya’s democratic transition and national security, must be held accountable. We welcome discussions on the political and security situation in Libya to be held by the United Nations Security Council in the coming days, including consequences for those who undermine Libya’s peace and stability.

We call on Libya’s interim government and the elected House of Representatives to adopt inclusive policies that benefit all Libyans and to build a government that meets the Libyan peoples’ needs for security, reconciliation, and prosperity. We encourage the Constitutional Drafting Assembly to immediately pursue the drafting of a document that enshrines and protects the rights of all Libyans. Further, we encourage the international community to support Libya’s elected institutions.

We believe outside interference in Libya exacerbates current divisions and undermines Libya’s democratic transition.

The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

Via:: US State Department